Partings, Last Day

Off to the Future
2 people that started the class this quarter had left before today. All but 4 people in this picture will be here next semester.

Today is the last day of the quarter. It has already been 6 months.

Some of these people I might never see again. But, if I go to Belgium, Taiwan, Brazil, England, or Germany I might be able to visit them.

Crossroads

Streetlights
(The intersection outside my apartment. The kids from the high school go down the hill on bike across the picture, and cars go along the road. I haven’t seen any horrible accidents yet, but someone locking up a tire in breaking is a daily occurrence)

Setup

A graph theory graph is a “a collection of vertices or ‘nodes’ and a collection of edges that connect pairs of vertices.” A node can have more than one edge leaving it, or none if it is a terminal node. An edge can be directed or undirected, meaning that you can move either way along that edge.

And now I will describe my life as a graph from the starting position (inside mom, thanks mom!) to my terminal position (crashing my car on the moon in 2070?). Each node would be a place, and an edge would be time spent going there. Some edges are undirected: I go back and forth between school and home.

There are several layers here, from the very specific: I go from my computer to the bathroom, to the very general: I go from working in the US to studying Japanese in Japan. The rest of this discussion will be around this level of detail.

My Story

In getting to this point (studying Japanese in Japan at the age of 25), I have made many decisions. (Like choosing which road to go along in the picture at the top). The main life-changing decisions that I can see are the course choices in middle school/high school, going to CU-Engineering to study CS, and then the work I did after college. Other things definitely changed me, like getting a TRS-80 Model 100, where I lived, but those are less in my control.

In either case, I chose/was moved along an edge to another node. I wonder what I would be like if those decisions were made differently. If there were an infinite number of parallel universes, then there would be a version of me at age 25 for each possible choice I could have made. Of course, the further back our paths parted, the less similar we would be, like a version of me that enlisted in the Navy at 18 would have done very different things. Likewise the version of me that joined the navy as an Officer after college. Or the version of me that didn’t move to Japan, and instead moved to Denver.

In a similar vein would be talking to myself 10 years ago. “Sorry kid, I don’t have a car any more. But I have gone through 4. Too bad I missed last fire season, but I did get some fires in January and March this year.” as I bike down the street to get something from the supermarket. And then talking in Japanese to a bunch of Taiwanese people.

Where will I be in even 5 years from now? Probably somewhere on Earth. Either the US or in Japan is most likely, but maybe I will be in Europe or Antarctica. Will I be married? What kind of work will I be doing? Maybe I even have my own company?

Me vs. The Class

When other people talk about their country, I refer to Colorado, since otherwise the answer would generally be “it depends”. Since everyone else in the class grew up in a city, and lived in a city before coming to Yamasa, when I talk about some of my experiences everyone in class can’t believe some of it.

Like how my cats know what bears, deer, chicken, foxes, pumas, coyotes, and hawks look like. (Someone suggested that I could open a zoo. Yep, and put up “House Cat” and “Human” as the labels, I replied) Or that I could drive 1,500km in any direction from my house and barely run into the sea. Or that I rode in a firetruck for 3,000km to get to a fire. And that that fire was 600,000 acres in size, about half the size of the prefecture I now live in.

And then guns… When the teachers ask “What have you become not able to do since coming to Japan”, I try hard to resist, but end up saying “I can’t use my guns.”

私の国へ行くなら

私の国へ行くなら
もしコロラド州へ行きたかったら、色々なことができます。山でキャンプができますが予約が必要かどうか調べたほうがいいです。案内書は山登りやハイキングをするのに便利ですが日本語で書いてあるかどうか知りません.自然の中でゆっくり休んで元気になってください.
でも、気をつければならないこともあります。例えば、高度が高くて全然蒸し暑くないので病気になりやすいです。病気にならないように十分水を飲んでください.酒を飲みすぎないようにしてください。
クマに会った場合は早く逃げたほうがいいです.クマにかまれないように安全距離を保ってください.

If you are going to my country:

If you are going to Colorado, you can do many things. You can camp in the mountains, but I don’t know if you need a reservation. A guidebook is useful for hiking or camping, but I don’t know if they are written in Japanese. Please relax in nature and have fun.
But, there are things you have to be careful. For example, due to the high altitude and low humidity, it is easy to become sick. In order to not become sick, please drink enough water. Don’t drink too much alcohol.
In case you meet a bear, please run away quickly. In order to not be bitten by a bear, please keep a safe distance.

Being Interviewed

Interview from corsec67 on Vimeo.

We practiced this a couple of times, and then did it in front of the class.

We didn’t make any jokes like most of the other groups did.

The speech goes something like this:
JJ: This is the winner of the F1 contest, Olaf! Congratulations. Your driving technique was amazing.
Olaf: Thank you
JJ: Were you nervous?
Olaf: Yes, I was.
JJ: Are you aware that it was broadcast on TV?
Olaf: Of course I knew.
JJ: The winnings are 100 million yen, what are you planning to do with it?
Olaf: I am thinking of doing things like buying a house, traveling. Since I was a kid I had a dream of going to other countries.
JJ: So, where are you going to travel?
Olaf: I want to go to places like Europe and South America.
JJ: Your childhood dream will be realized.
Olaf: Yes. Would it be acceptable if I add one more thing?
JJ: Go ahead.
Olaf: I would like to say thank you to my staff for helping me participate in this race.